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acne Archives | ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetic and Surgical Conference

Free Virtual Conference: GW Virtual Acne Appraisal Conference

By | Medical Dermatology, Patient Care | No Comments
GW Virtual Appraisal of Advances in Acne

Hosted by George Washington University, in Partnership with ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetic & Surgical Conference and Next Steps in Derm

Even during a global pandemic we cannot forget that Acne Vulgaris is one of if not THE most common skin condition afflicting our patients and the general populace. With the disruption of clinics and conferences, innovative vehicles for the dissemination of the most up to date data and expert anecdote are certainly and sorely needed.

Enter the GW Virtual Acne Appraisal Conference: A 3 hour program that promises to pander to your pimple popping practices with short but sweet lectures from the acne gurus covering the gamut of the big A. From treatments to treats, from considering the microbiome to unique treatment approaches in specific patient populations, we will cover it all. And if that wasn’t enough, we will round it out with a perusal of the therapeutic pipeline. It will be all that and a bag of chips (which may or may not cause acne…you need to tune in to find out).

Agenda

8:00 – 8:15 – Introduction and Welcome
8:15 – Topical Management of Acne– James Q. Del Rosso, DO, FAOCD, FAAD
8:30 – Use of Hormonal Therapies in Acne– Julie Harper, MD
8:50 – Use of Antibiotics in Acne – Neal Bhatia, MD
9:10 – Issues with Isotretinoin: Fact vs. Fiction – Jenna C. Lester, MD
9:30 – Microbiome Manipulation for the Management of Acne – Adam Friedman, MD, FAAD
9:45 –  Diet and Alternative Therapies: What to know for Acne management – Vivian Shi, MD
10:00 – Management Considerations for Skin of Color Patients with Acne –Andrew Alexis, MD, MPH
10:20 – Managing Acne in the LGBTQ+ Population – Angelo Landriscina, MD
10:40 – New and Emerging Therapies for Acne – Leon Kircik, MD

Hormonal Acne with Sima Jain, MD

By | Medical Dermatology, ODAC Sessions | No Comments
Sima Jain faculty image

Source: Next Steps in Dermatology

ODAC speaker, Sima Jain, MD provides a two-part series on Hormonal Acne for Next Steps in Derm.

Dermatologists should be able to distinguish which patients presenting with acne may need further evaluation for a possible underlying endocrinopathy. In this two-part series, Dr. Jain will be focuses on hormonal acne specifically related to PCOS, including the exam, work up, diagnosis, treatment and long-term implications of this syndrome.

PCOS is a complex disorder affecting 5-10% of reproductive-age women and is characterized by a state of hyperandrogenism and often hyperinsulinemia. It is the most common endocrine disorder in women and is a major cause of infertility due to lack of ovulation. Patients can present with a wide range of symptoms, which may make the precise diagnosis difficult.

Acne is a common skin manifestation but other potential findings may include hirsutism (increased terminal hairs in a male-pattern distribution, scalp alopecia, acanthosis nigricans and less frequently seborrheic dermatitis. Non-dermatologic symptoms and signs may include irregular menses (oligomenorrhea), insulin resistance, polycystic ovaries and infertility.

Since a dermatologist may be the first or only physician a young female patient with hormonal acne sees, it is imperative for us to be aware of the clinical clues that suggest hyperandrogenism. First, it is important to inquire if the patient’s menstrual cycles are regular to screen for oligomenorrhea and potential anovulation. Be mindful if the patient is on an oral contraceptive pill, as this can mask underlying oligomenorrhea since the external hormones are essentially regulating the menstrual cycle. In addition to discussing the menstrual history, it is important to inquire about potential hirsutism by asking if the patient has noticed increased hair growth to the face (sideburn area, chin, upper cutaneous lip), chest, abdomen and/or inner thighs. Many patients do not realize that increased hair growth may be related to acne and often feel embarrassed to bring it up on their own. A third important feature to be aware of is hair loss to the scalp. It is not uncommon for patients to say they have noticed thinning of their hair or increased shedding, especially to the front of their scalp.

Visit Next Steps in Derm to read the series or attend ODAC to learn more.

Hormonal Acne with Sima Jain, MD: Part 2

By | Medical Dermatology, ODAC Sessions, Video Pearls | No Comments
Hormonal Acne Patient Image

Source: Next Steps in Dermatology

ODAC speaker, Sima Jain, MD provides a two-part series on Hormonal Acne for Next Steps in Derm.

Dermatologists should be able to distinguish which patients presenting with acne may need further evaluation for a possible underlying endocrinopathy. In this two-part series, Dr. Jain will be focuses on hormonal acne specifically related to PCOS, including the exam, work up, diagnosis, treatment and long-term implications of this syndrome.

PCOS is a complex disorder affecting 5-10% of reproductive-age women and is characterized by a state of hyperandrogenism and often hyperinsulinemia. It is the most common endocrine disorder in women and is a major cause of infertility due to lack of ovulation. Patients can present with a wide range of symptoms, which may make the precise diagnosis difficult.

Acne is a common skin manifestation but other potential findings may include hirsutism (increased terminal hairs in a male-pattern distribution, scalp alopecia, acanthosis nigricans and less frequently seborrheic dermatitis. Non-dermatologic symptoms and signs may include irregular menses (oligomenorrhea), insulin resistance, polycystic ovaries and infertility.

Since a dermatologist may be the first or only physician a young female patient with hormonal acne sees, it is imperative for us to be aware of the clinical clues that suggest hyperandrogenism. First, it is important to inquire if the patient’s menstrual cycles are regular to screen for oligomenorrhea and potential anovulation. Be mindful if the patient is on an oral contraceptive pill, as this can mask underlying oligomenorrhea since the external hormones are essentially regulating the menstrual cycle. In addition to discussing the menstrual history, it is important to inquire about potential hirsutism by asking if the patient has noticed increased hair growth to the face (sideburn area, chin, upper cutaneous lip), chest, abdomen and/or inner thighs. Many patients do not realize that increased hair growth may be related to acne and often feel embarrassed to bring it up on their own. A third important feature to be aware of is hair loss to the scalp. It is not uncommon for patients to say they have noticed thinning of their hair or increased shedding, especially to the front of their scalp.

Visit Next Steps in Derm to read the full series or attend ODAC to learn more.