Monthly Archives

January 2019

ODAC and JDD Award Dr. Alan Menter

By | Medical Dermatology, ODAC Sessions, Patient Care | No Comments
Dr. Mentor Presenting at ODAC

Source: Practical Dermatology

Alan Menter, MD, has been awarded the Outstanding Researcher and Educator in Psoriatic Disease Award by the ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetics & Surgical Conference, in partnership with the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology (JDD).

The award recognizes Dr. Menter’s significant contribution and lifetime commitment to the advancement of psoriatic disease research as well as his work guiding the next generation of psoriasis experts and researchers.

“Dr. Menter has dedicated his career to improving psoriasis treatment options and standards of care while also pouring countless hours into up-and-coming psoriasis experts and researchers, ensuring his legacy will continue for generations to come,” said Shelley Tanner, CEO and president of SanovaWorks, which produces the JDD and ODAC.

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Male vs. Female Aesthetic Consultation – ODAC Dermatology Conference

By | Aesthetic Dermatology, ODAC Sessions, Patient Care | No Comments
Terrence Keaney Male Aesthetics at ODAC

Source: Dermatology News

The first time a man walks in for an aesthetic consultation, he probably doesn’t know what to expect, according to Terrence Keaney, MD, a dermatologist in private practice in Arlington, Va. And he may not even be sure what he’s looking for.

However, he probably knows what he doesn’t like about his appearance. When men are questioned, the three areas they are most concerned about is their hairline, their eyes, and their jawline, said Dr. Keaney, speaking at the Orlando Dermatology Aesthetic and Clinical Conference.

It’s important to evaluate men differently, not just for anatomic differences from women, but also for behavioral and psychological factors unique to men as aesthetic patients, he noted.

Hot Topics in Infectious Disease

By | Medical Dermatology, ODAC Sessions | No Comments
Justin Finch MD Presenting at ODAC Dermatology Conference

Source: Dermatology News

New tricks from ticks, near-zero Zika, and the perils of personal grooming: Dermatologists have a lot to think about along the infectious disease spectrum in 2019, according to Justin Finch, MD, speaking at the Orlando Dermatology Aesthetic and Clinical Conference.

Anaphylaxis from alpha-gal syndrome is on the rise, caused in part by the geographic spread of the Lone Star tick. Beginning in 2006, isolated cases of an anaphylactic reaction to cetuximab, the epidermal growth factor receptor antagonist used to treat certain cancers, began to be seen in a curious geographic distribution. “The anaphylaxis cases were restricted to the southeastern United States, the home of the Lone Star tick,” said Dr. Finch, of the department of dermatology at the University of Connecticut, Farmington.

With some detective work, physicians and epidemiologists eventually determined that patients were reacting to an oligosaccharide called galactose-alpha–1,3-galactose (alpha-gal) found in cetuximab. This protein is also found in the meat of nonprimate mammals; individuals in the southeastern United States, where the Lone Star tick is endemic, had been sensitized via exposure to alpha-gal from Lone Star tick bites.

“Alpha-gal syndrome is on the rise,” said Dr. Finch, driven by the increased spread of this tick. Individuals who are sensitized develop delayed anaphylaxis 2-7 hours after ingesting red meat such as beef, pork, or lamb. “Ask about it,” said Dr. Finch, in patients who develop urticaria, dyspnea, angioedema, or hypotension without a clear offender. Because of the delay between allergen ingestion and anaphylaxis, it can be hard to connect the dots.

 

Hyperhydrosis: Where Are We Now?

By | Medical Dermatology, ODAC Sessions | No Comments
Video of Dr. Adam Friedman

Source:Dermatology News

When you extend your hand to a new patient, and he reflexively wipes his palm before shaking hands, be alert. It’s possible you’re seeing primary hyperhidrosis, a condition that’s both more common and more disabling than once thought.

“Looking at the biology of sweating, normally, it’s a good thing – we need it to survive. However, hyperhidrosis is too much of a good thing – it’s an excess of what is needed for normal biology,” said Adam Friedman, MD, speaking at the Orlando Dermatology Aesthetic and Clinical Conference.

Recent data, he pointed out, show that hyperhidrosis is more prevalent than previously thought – about 4.8% of individuals may have the condition, with about half having axillary hyperhidrosis. Symptoms peak in early adulthood, with adults aged 18-54 most affected. “These are the prime working years,” he said.

About 2% of teens are affected, and many adults report that symptoms began before they were 12 years old. Hand hyperhidrosis is a factor for computer and electronic device work, sports, and even handling paper and pencils, noted Dr. Friedman, professor of dermatology at George Washington University, Washington.

“Does it affect quality of life? Yes. We have data to support the impact. The adverse impact is actually greater than that of eczema and psoriasis,” he said, adding that patients won’t always bring up their concerns about sweating. “Often, it’s the patient who apologizes for having sweaty palms or who sticks to the paper on the exam table. It’s worth asking these patients if they are bothered by excessive sweating.”

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