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Video Pearls

Therapeutic Updates in Melanoma

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ODAC Dermatology Conference, in partnership with Next Steps in Derm, interviewed Dr. David Miller, Instructor in Dermatology and Medicine at Harvard Medical School and member of the Department of Dermatology and the Department of Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, where he is co-director of the Merkel cell carcinoma treatment program. Watch as he shares important updates on Immuno-Oncology (IO) strategies for melanoma.

Melasma: Treatment Pearls from the Expert

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Next Steps in Derm, in partnership with ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetic and Surgical Conference, interviewed Dr. Vic Ross, Director of the Scripps Clinic Laser and Cosmetic Dermatology Center in San Diego, CA, on his approach and the various interventions he uses for the treatment of Melasma. Watch as he shares fresh practical pearls immediately useful in your practice.

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Hydroxychloroquine, Pentoxifylline, and Colchicine: Off-Label is ON in Dermatology

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So many diseases, so few FDA approved indications. Between the mind-numbing time and cost from bench to bottle, it is no surprise that dermatologists, as masters of the integument are the off-label bandits, marrying their wealth of knowledge on the pathophysiology of skin diseases to the mechanisms by which medications work to create an evidenced-based armament of therapies for both common and rare diseases alike. Where a primary care physician sees a blood pressure medication, a dermatologist sees an effective medication for acne. A medication for malaria you say? They use it for a plethora of complex diseases ranging from Lupus to scarring hair loss. The lengthy list of medications used off-label in dermatology continues to grow and for good reason and fortune.

Next Steps in Derm, in partnership with ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetic and Surgical Conference interviewed Dr. Adam Friedman, Professor, Interim Chair of Dermatology, and Residency Program Director at George Washington University, who shared off-label uses of drugs such as Hydroxychloroquine (currently under investigation for the treatment of patients with COVID-19), Pentoxifylline, and Colchicine. A wealth of clinical pearls you don’t want to miss!

Additional video pearls can be found here.

Clinical Photography: Pearls from the ODAC Dermatology Conference

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Clinical photography is a critical tool for the dermatologist and has rapidly become standard of care in the digital era.  While a point-and-click approach to photography is sufficient for some circumstances, there are some simple tricks and techniques that will elevate your photography to a new level of professionalism.

Next Steps in Derm, in partnership with ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetic and Surgical Conference interviewed Dr. Justin Finch, Associate Professor of Dermatology at UConn and Co-Founder of Central Connecticut Dermatology who shared his top 3 pearls for improving clinical photography in your practice.

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What’s New in Treatments for Hair Loss with Amy McMichael, MD

By | Aesthetic Dermatology, Medical Dermatology, ODAC Sessions, Video Pearls | No Comments

During the 2020 ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetic and Surgical Conference, Dr. Amy McMichael, Professor and Chair of Dermatology at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine, sat down with Next Steps in Derm to share important updates regarding treatments on the horizon for the most common forms of hair loss. Dr. McMichael will be presenting at Skin of Color Update 2020 with lectures including Hair & Scalp Disorders in SOC: Diagnostic Approaches and Hot Topics & Controversies in Photoprotection: Making sense of it all.

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Hormonal Acne with Sima Jain, MD: Part 2

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Hormonal Acne Patient Image

Source: Next Steps in Dermatology

ODAC speaker, Sima Jain, MD provides a two-part series on Hormonal Acne for Next Steps in Derm.

Dermatologists should be able to distinguish which patients presenting with acne may need further evaluation for a possible underlying endocrinopathy. In this two-part series, Dr. Jain will be focuses on hormonal acne specifically related to PCOS, including the exam, work up, diagnosis, treatment and long-term implications of this syndrome.

PCOS is a complex disorder affecting 5-10% of reproductive-age women and is characterized by a state of hyperandrogenism and often hyperinsulinemia. It is the most common endocrine disorder in women and is a major cause of infertility due to lack of ovulation. Patients can present with a wide range of symptoms, which may make the precise diagnosis difficult.

Acne is a common skin manifestation but other potential findings may include hirsutism (increased terminal hairs in a male-pattern distribution, scalp alopecia, acanthosis nigricans and less frequently seborrheic dermatitis. Non-dermatologic symptoms and signs may include irregular menses (oligomenorrhea), insulin resistance, polycystic ovaries and infertility.

Since a dermatologist may be the first or only physician a young female patient with hormonal acne sees, it is imperative for us to be aware of the clinical clues that suggest hyperandrogenism. First, it is important to inquire if the patient’s menstrual cycles are regular to screen for oligomenorrhea and potential anovulation. Be mindful if the patient is on an oral contraceptive pill, as this can mask underlying oligomenorrhea since the external hormones are essentially regulating the menstrual cycle. In addition to discussing the menstrual history, it is important to inquire about potential hirsutism by asking if the patient has noticed increased hair growth to the face (sideburn area, chin, upper cutaneous lip), chest, abdomen and/or inner thighs. Many patients do not realize that increased hair growth may be related to acne and often feel embarrassed to bring it up on their own. A third important feature to be aware of is hair loss to the scalp. It is not uncommon for patients to say they have noticed thinning of their hair or increased shedding, especially to the front of their scalp.

Visit Next Steps in Derm to read the full series or attend ODAC to learn more.