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Aesthetic Dermatology

View On-Demand: Starting Your Own Dermatology Practice: Expert Panel Discussion

By | Aesthetic Dermatology, Medical Dermatology, Patient Care, Video Pearls | No Comments

This webinar was previously recorded on July 1, 2020 and is now available on demand.

Hosted by ODAC
In Partnership with The Journal of Drugs in Dermatology
ODAC in partnership with the JDD, invite you to join your dermatology colleagues as we discuss strategies, steps and best practices for starting your own dermatology practice. Expert panelists will discuss their experiences with securing financing, choosing devices, hiring contractors and running a practice. They will give insights into what they wish they knew before beginning their practice, offer practical tips and much more!
MODERATOR
Aanand N. Geria, MD, FAAD (Founder, Geria Dermatology – Rutherford, NJ)
PANELISTS
Matthew J. Elias, DO, FAAD (Co-Founder, Elias Dermatology – Fort Lauderdale, FL)
Rishi K. Gandhi, MD, FAAD (CEO & Director, Ohio Skin Surgery and Cosmetic Center – Dayton, OH)
Chesahna Kindred, MD, MBA, FAAD (Founder, Kindred Hair & Skin Center – Columbia, MD)
Omar N. Qutub, MD FAAD (Founder, Dermatology By Design LLC – Portland, OR)

The Business of Dermatology: A Must Read

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The Business of Dermatology Cover Image

Business intellect, a vital aspect of managing a practice, is not taught in residency. From the infancy of their training, dermatologists are trained to think broadly and scrupulously, using each clue, each corporeal sense, and each available tool to accurately diagnose and manage a plethora of cutaneous conditions. After residency, dermatologists set out armed with the knowledge and drive to deliver expert care to their future patients. However, despite their education and best intentions, lack of business acumen can hinder even the brightest and most motivated of practitioners. In order to enlighten oneself in the complicated field of business management, clinicians are left to fend for themselves, often learning as they go, sometimes making unnecessary mistakes, and adjusting their business practices reactively. Retrospective “trial and error” learning is time-consuming, cumbersome, and costly. Why not short track and get the goods without the trial and error, making costly mistakes and taking years. The new book, The Business of Dermatology is a cornerstone achievement in the standardization of business education for dermatologists.

Edited by Drs. Jeffrey S. Dover and Kavita Mariwalla, and authored by impressive experts in the field, The Business of Dermatology offers a comprehensive guide to opening, maintaining, and sustaining a practice. To start, the power of this textbook fundamentally lies in the experience and scope of its authorship. The authors were hand-selected by the editors ensuring that each chapter was written by a tried and true expert in that subject. Unlike other textbooks in the field of business management and administration that are primarily written by individuals from the business world, some of whom have no insight into the inner machinations of the medical world, or hands-on experience, the authors of this book are well-known, respected dermatologists that hail from thriving practices of their own. The reader has an unprecedented opportunity to learn from the firsthand experiences of top authorities who live and breathe dermatology. Using conversational prose, the authors depict their experiences, trials, and errors, employing specific real-world examples and scenarios while tackling each subject.

A notable forte of The Business of Dermatology is the sheer breadth and range of topics discussed in the textbook by medical as well as surgical dermatologists. Opening and managing a practice is a daunting endeavor with twists, turns, and hidden hurdles that one cannot foresee until stumbling across them. The Business of Dermatology unveils those twists, turns, and hurdles for the reader, taking the “guessing game” out of the equation. Fifty-five chapters elucidate every aspect of running a practice, covering all practice-relevant topics, including office space and equipment, managing financials, diverse practice models, human resources, employment considerations, patient issues, pricing, essential surgical tools/supplies, marketing, and much more. The Business of Dermatology lays bare every facet of handling a dermatologic practice, so much so that even a well-run, seasoned practice stands to learn new tools and tips to elevate itself to a higher level.

And now more than ever in the “Time of Covid” we are in desperate need of information from The Business of Dermatology. Many of us are inventing the wheel with the significant changes that are occurring in Dermatology, and the practice of our specialty.

The wealth of knowledge endowed in each chapter is written and formatted in such a style that renders each chapter extremely easy to read and comprehend. First, the prose used in the chapters is conversational – as such, the reader is fully immersed in each topic as if he/she were having a face-to-face chat with the authors. Furthermore, references are used only when absolutely necessary. The reader is not bogged down by superfluous references and discussions that may dim the vital discussion points of the chapters. Finally, embedded within each chapter are practical tips that are immediately implementable and a Top Ten list that highlights the key take-home points, making “reading on the run” possible. The novice practice owner need not fear the residency dogma of “trying to drink from a gushing fire hydrant” with this easy-to-read, catchy and focused textbook.

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Dr. Adam Friedman Discusses 2021 ODAC Dermatology Conference Program

By | Aesthetic Dermatology, Medical Dermatology, ODAC Sessions, Patient Care, Surgical Dermatology, Video Pearls | No Comments

ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetic & Surgical Conference’s Medical Director, Dr. Adam Friedman, discusses the ODAC 2021 program, reasons to attend and more!

To view the full agenda, click here: https://orlandoderm.org/agenda/

ODAC Dermatology Conference is the premier clinical dermatology conference expertly curated to provide comprehensive, annual updates and fresh pearls in medical, aesthetic and surgical dermatology. Check out our blog and media coverage.
The 2021 ODAC dermatology conference focuses on new uses for old treatments, incorporating new treatments, products and treatment lines, critical updates in diagnosis guidelines, as well as advanced techniques for enhancing your surgical and nonsurgical patient outcomes.

Full-Field Ablative Resurfacing: Is the Pendulum Swinging Back?

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According to ODAC Vice-Chair Dr. Joel Cohen, Director of AboutSkin Dermatology (Greenwood Village and Lone Tree, Colorado),  and Associate Clinical Professor at the University of California at Irvine, the pendulum is swinging back to heavy resurfacing in areas such as around the mouth and around the eyes that really need it. He uses full-field erbium resurfacing and shares why this is the way to go.

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What’s New in Treatments for Hair Loss with Amy McMichael, MD

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During the 2020 ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetic and Surgical Conference, Dr. Amy McMichael, Professor and Chair of Dermatology at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine, sat down with Next Steps in Derm to share important updates regarding treatments on the horizon for the most common forms of hair loss. Dr. McMichael will be presenting at Skin of Color Update 2020 with lectures including Hair & Scalp Disorders in SOC: Diagnostic Approaches and Hot Topics & Controversies in Photoprotection: Making sense of it all.

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Tips for Treating Male Aesthetic Patients: Q&A with ODAC Faculty

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Terrence Keaney Male Aesthetics at ODAC

Source: The Dermatologist

The following is an excerpt from The Dermatologist article on Q&A with ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetic and Surgical conference faculty, Terrence Keaney, MD.  

More and more men are seeking cosmetic procedures to improve their appearance and slow the aging process. In addition to anatomical differences, men have different concerns about how they look compared with women. Terrence Keaney, MD, discussed these concerns and trends among male aesthetic patients, and also shared pearls for treating this patient population at ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetic and Surgical conference in Orlando, FL.

Dr Keaney is founder and director of SkinDC and an assistant clinical professor of dermatology at George Washington University School of Medicine.

The Dermatologist: What are some common trends among male aesthetic patients?

Dr Keaney: Like broader trends in aesthetics, there is no cookie cutter technique for treating men. Gender is just one data point, albeit a fairly important one because it affects biology, anatomy, behavioral expectations, etc. When evaluating a new cosmetic patient, gender, age, ethnicity, and other patient factors play a role in creating a customized treatment plan.

Understanding aesthetic procedures among male patients has not been well-studied and has not been on the top of many aesthetic providers minds, most likely because men occupy a smaller percentage of cosmetic patients. However, the number of men seeking minimally invasive procedures is growing.

As more men seek cosmetic treatment, it is important that physicians and practitioners know how to approach these patients from a treatment perspective, as well as how to discuss complications from these procedures because these scenarios may be different compared with female patients.

The Dermatologist: What are some of the differences between male and female patients that dermatologists should keep in mind?

Dr Keaney: The number one difference between men and women is anatomy. Anatomy really dictates how a provider will perform a procedure, especially fillers.

The facial anatomy of men is very different than women. For example, the distribution of fat is different between the sexes. Men have less subcutaneous fat in the face, especially in the medial cheeks and middle of the cheek, and do not have high cheekbones, which dictates where a filler would be placed. The apex of the cheek tends to be lower and more towards the middle in men, whereas the apex tends to be high and lateral in women and is considered a very feminine feature.

Behaviors, such as goals and expectations of cosmetic procedures, differ between men and women as well. Men care about different factors than women. Specifically, men worry about 3 areas: the hairline, eyeline, and jawline. When discussing aesthetic procedures and performing a full-face analysis of male patients, I often refer back to these 3 areas because I know men tend to worry about them the most.

However, this does not mean I do not use fillers on the cheeks or the mid-face. When I use a filler, I explain to the patient so they understand how this procedure may influence how their jaw looks or their eyes look. Otherwise, they may not be interested in that treatment option.

Other major concerns among men include hair loss and body contouring.

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Dr. Susan Weinkle Receives ODAC JDD Award

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Susan Weinkle MD image from ODAC Dermatology conference

Source: Practical Dermatology

Susan Weinkle, MD, has been awarded the Outstanding Educator and Mentor in Dermatology Award by the ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetics & Surgical Conference, in partnership with the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology (JDD).

The award recognizes Dr. Weinkle for her long-standing commitment to educating and mentoring the next generation of dermatologists and for devoting a major portion of her professional life to enhancing the practice and profession of dermatology through education.

“Susan has given all of us in aesthetics so much of her time and energy, and I am honored to present this award to her.”“It is a pleasure and an honor to recognize the tireless work of exceptional leaders in dermatology,” said Shelley Tanner, CEO and president of SanovaWorks, which produces the JDD, ODAC, Derm In-Review, and Next Steps in Dermatology. “Not only do these dermatology leaders dedicate their entire lives to benefiting patients every day, but after the ‘work day’ ends, they spend countless hours involved in activities to improve the specialty’s future. We congratulate Dr. Weinkle for being chosen for this award.”

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Susan Weinkle, M.D., Presented JDD Outstanding Educator Award

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Susan Weinkle MD image from ODAC Dermatology conference

Source: DermatologyTimes

A south Florida practitioner’s contribution to dermatology is not going unnoticed at the 2020 Orlando Dermatology, Aesthetic & Surgical Conference (ODAC) with the recent presentation of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology (JDD) Outstanding Educator & Mentor in Dermatology Award to Susan Weinkle, M.D, Tampa, Fla.

Dr. Weinkle, an assistant clinical professor of dermatology at the University of South Florida, was recognized for her dedication to mentoring and educating future dermatologists, and commitment to advancing the dermatology industry through education.

Aside from being an educator, Dr. Weinkle specializes in cosmetic surgery and Mohs Micrographic Surgery at her private practice in Bradenton, Fla.

She was also the president of the American Society for Dermatological Surgery and the Women’s Dermatological Society. Additionally, she was previously a committee chair and board of directors member at numerous dermatology organizations including the Florida Society of Dermatology and Dermatologic Surgery, American Academy of Dermatology and Dermatology Foundation.

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Making Sense of Cosmeceuticals

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Cosmeceuticals Image

Dermatology thought leader Hilary Baldwin, MD helps us make sense of cosmeceuticals by sharing her approach to them, including how to define them and evaluate their utility.

On a funny note, Dr. Baldwin confesses being a skeptic and a hypocrite when it comes to cosmeceuticals. She remains skeptical about some of the science but at the same time uses 5 cosmeceutical products herself. We love her honesty!

What is a cosmeceutical?

The term was accredited to Albert Kilgman in 1984 as the ill-defined realm between cosmetics and prescription skincare products. Like a cosmetic, it is topically applied; like a drug, it contains ingredients that influence biologic functioning of the skin.

Different meaning to different groups

Fortunately for the FDA, they have no comment (and we would prefer to keep it that way!). Cosmetic companies consider them to be well-studied actives with proven efficacy. For most dermatologists, they are not well studied, they have some data behind them and are products that may or may not live up to claims (some of which are quite grandiose!). Cosmeticdermatologists on the other hand, feel a little bit different and think these are products that may alter wound healing and may prolong the effects of cosmetic procedures. Patients, however, consider cosmeceuticals to be miracle cures, which Dr. Baldwin believes is the problem and where a disconnect exists. In the quest for medical cures, we don’t want patients to be dissatisfied and frustrated…and poor. It is unlikely that topicals, or at least a single topical, can fully address the complex process and major issues that causes the aging appearance, such as:

  • Pervasive cumulative sun damage
  • Loss of hormones (particularly estrogens)
  • Cell senescence
  • Fat depletion
  • Damage to DNA
  • Repetitive muscle movement
  • Genetics
  • Gravity

Dr. Baldwin notes that when patients come into the office, they have a couple of specific requests: “Do I need a face lift yet?”, “What can you do to fix my face?”. Sometimes they even ask if there is some magic cream they can put on their face to make them look less tired. Dr. Baldwin suggests to her patients to think of their face as an old couch in their living room that they no longer care for. Do they no longer care for it because it is sagging and actually has structural abnormalities, or do they not like it because the slipcovers are torn and stained? When we talk about cosmeceuticals, what we are talking about is slipcover repair, we are not talking about sagging skin because cosmeceuticals may be able to handle the drying on the sofa but they are not going to help with the sagging of the sofa.

Why do dermatologists need to be well-informed?

The average U.S. woman uses 15 different cosmetic products each day. If you figure that each of them contains 10-50 ingredients, the average woman is putting an awful lot of chemicals on her face every day, and it should be something that actually works, is safe, and non-irritating.

The truth is that patients dolike to use cosmeceuticals as feel they are doing something for themselves. Cosmeceuticals can make retinoids more tolerable and effective and can prolong or improve the results of cosmetic procedures.

Dr. Baldwin believes it is the job of dermatologists to help patients make reasonable choices and manage their expectations. How often does a patient come to you with a bunch of pieces of papers from magazines and newspapers and ask you about all these miracle cures? Or bring you a before and after picture saying, “Look at how much better she looks in the after picture” which is clearly a photographic cure, or perhapsthere is actually a cure there, but we can make no judgements based on these photographs which are just rampantin the magazines patients are looking at.

The fear of wrinkles, coupled with the fear of procedures, make some of Dr. Baldwin’s patients say that “they are looking for something better than Botox”. But is there a topical that is superior to fillers and neuromodulating agents? The magazines say there is…so it must be true, and then we have “friends” in the media who tell us every day there are products out there, one on Monday, a completely different one on Tuesday, yet a different one on Wednesday that will be life changing.

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